From Pagano to San Siro

 Fancying an original sushi restaurant? Then go to Kiyo!

In Japanese, Kiyo means “pure”, and this is exactly how the restaurant presents itself: the predominant colors are white and beige, all the superfluous furniture is excluded and in the air you can smell a sleigh scent of incense. These premises make Kiyo a stylish and sophisticated restaurant. Its elegant nature is indeed very tangible, but Mrs. Lucia’s mantra (she is an associate) has not been put aside: hospitality and kindness above anything else.

The cooks, strictly Japanese, juggle behind the counter surrounded by salmon and knives. We suggest you to try one of the appetizers, in particular the Aburi Salmon Sashimi Karashisumiso: a long and obscure name to describe salmon seared fillets served with boiled asparagus, salmon eggs and a Japanese sauce similar to mustard.

The Asian restaurants usually do not excel for their desserts and the menu always lists merely ice creams, either kept in a coconut shell or fried. Kiyo differs from its competitors because of a particular dish: a chocolate sphere filled with green tea ice cream inside and served next to a glass full of warm caramel to pour over the chocolate… a real treat!






In Japanese, Kiyo means “pure”, and this is exactly how the restaurant presents itself: the predominant colors are white and beige, all the superfluous furniture is excluded and in the air you can smell a sleigh scent of incense. These premises make Kiyo a stylish and sophisticated restaurant. Its elegant nature is indeed very tangible, but Mrs. Lucia’s mantra (she is an associate) has not been put aside: hospitality and kindness above anything else.

The cooks, strictly Japanese, juggle behind the counter surrounded by salmon and knives. We suggest you to try one of the appetizers, in particular the Aburi Salmon Sashimi Karashisumiso: a long and obscure name to describe salmon seared fillets served with boiled asparagus, salmon eggs and a Japanese sauce similar to mustard.

The Asian restaurants usually do not excel for their desserts and the menu always lists merely ice creams, either kept in a coconut shell or fried. Kiyo differs from its competitors because of a particular dish: a chocolate sphere filled with green tea ice cream inside and served next to a glass full of warm caramel to pour over the chocolate… a real treat!

In Japanese, Kiyo means “pure”, and this is exactly how the restaurant presents itself: the predominant colors are white and beige, all the superfluous furniture is excluded and in the air you can smell a sleigh scent of incense. These premises make Kiyo a stylish and sophisticated restaurant. Its elegant nature is indeed very tangible, but Mrs. Lucia’s mantra (she is an associate) has not been put aside: hospitality and kindness above anything else.

The cooks, strictly Japanese, juggle behind the counter surrounded by salmon and knives. We suggest you to try one of the appetizers, in particular the Aburi Salmon Sashimi Karashisumiso: a long and obscure name to describe salmon seared fillets served with boiled asparagus, salmon eggs and a Japanese sauce similar to mustard.

The Asian restaurants usually do not excel for their desserts and the menu always lists merely ice creams, either kept in a coconut shell or fried. Kiyo differs from its competitors because of a particular dish: a chocolate sphere filled with green tea ice cream inside and served next to a glass full of warm caramel to pour over the chocolate… a real treat!

In Japanese, Kiyo means “pure”, and this is exactly how the restaurant presents itself: the predominant colors are white and beige, all the superfluous furniture is excluded and in the air you can smell a sleigh scent of incense. These premises make Kiyo a stylish and sophisticated restaurant. Its elegant nature is indeed very tangible, but Mrs. Lucia’s mantra (she is an associate) has not been put aside: hospitality and kindness above anything else.

The cooks, strictly Japanese, juggle behind the counter surrounded by salmon and knives. We suggest you to try one of the appetizers, in particular the Aburi Salmon Sashimi Karashisumiso: a long and obscure name to describe salmon seared fillets served with boiled asparagus, salmon eggs and a Japanese sauce similar to mustard.

The Asian restaurants usually do not excel for their desserts and the menu always lists merely ice creams, either kept in a coconut shell or fried. Kiyo differs from its competitors because of a particular dish: a chocolate sphere filled with green tea ice cream inside and served next to a glass full of warm caramel to pour over the chocolate… a real treat!

In Japanese, Kiyo means “pure”, and this is exactly how the restaurant presents itself: the predominant colors are white and beige, all the superfluous furniture is excluded and in the air you can smell a sleigh scent of incense. These premises make Kiyo a stylish and sophisticated restaurant. Its elegant nature is indeed very tangible, but Mrs. Lucia’s mantra (she is an associate) has not been put aside: hospitality and kindness above anything else.

The cooks, strictly Japanese, juggle behind the counter surrounded by salmon and knives. We suggest you to try one of the appetizers, in particular the Aburi Salmon Sashimi Karashisumiso: a long and obscure name to describe salmon seared fillets served with boiled asparagus, salmon eggs and a Japanese sauce similar to mustard.

The Asian restaurants usually do not excel for their desserts and the menu always lists merely ice creams, either kept in a coconut shell or fried. Kiyo differs from its competitors because of a particular dish: a chocolate sphere filled with green tea ice cream inside and served next to a glass full of warm caramel to pour over the chocolate… a real treat!


Via Carlo Ravizza, 4, Milano, MI, Italia
€  30-80
Everyday: 12.00-14.45 19.00-00.00
02 4814295     www.kiyo.it
Share on Facebook 31 Tweet about this on Twitter 0 Share on Google+ 4 Share on LinkedIn 1 Pin on Pinterest 0 Print this page Email this to someone

Other spots of interest in the neighborhood